I discharge before intercourse, especially during foreplay, how do I delay ejaculation?

April 20th, 2010 // faq

Premature ejaculation is defined as persistent or recurrent ejaculation with minimal sexual stimulation, before, on, or shortly after penetration.

There are different levels of treatment, psychological, behavioral and pharmacological. On this website we focus on the behavioral modification techniques. These require time and commitment, so you have to practice them with patience.
Behavior therapy constitutes practicing certain techniques that improve penile function. Two such techniques developed by Master’s and Johnson are ‘the pause’ and ‘the squeeze technique’.

Here is a step by step description of how they work.
1.The female partner should slowly begin stimulation of the male and should stop as soon as he senses a feeling of excessive excitement that may lead to ejaculatory inevitability.

2.Then, she should administer a firm compression of the penis just behind the Glans, pressing mainly under the penis. This should be uncomfortable but not painful.
(To view a picture of how to hold the penis, follow this link
http://www2.hu-berlin.de/sexology/ECE5/squeeze_technique.html )

3.Stimulation then should begin again after the male has a feeling that the ejaculation is no longer imminent.

4.The process should be repeated and practiced at least 10 or more times. You can lubricate the penis with KY jelly so that it mimics the vaginal environment.
(Gradually, most males find this technique helps decrease the impending inevitable need to ejaculate.)

5.After a period of practicing this method, the couple can sit facing each other, with the woman’s legs crossing on top of the male’s legs. She can stimulate him by manipulating his penis close to, then with friction against, her vulval area. Each time he senses excessive excitement, she can
apply the squeeze and stop all stimulation until he calms down enough for the process to be repeated.

Finally, intercourse may be attempted, with the female partner in the superior position so that she may withdraw immediately and again apply a squeeze to remove his urge to climax.

Most couples find this technique works. It can also help the female partner to be more aroused and can shorten her time to climax since it ends up extending foreplay.

If a person can achieve another erection in a few minutes following an episode of premature ejaculation, he may find that his control is much better the second time. Therefore

  • Some therapists advise men (usually younger men) to masturbate (or have their partner stimulate them rapidly to climax) 1-2 hours before sexual relations are planned.
  • The interval for achieving a second climax often includes a much longer period of inactivity, and the male can usually exert better control in this setting.
  • In older men, such a strategy may be less effective because older men may have difficulty achieving a second erection after first rapid sexual release. So it is better not to try it in older men since it can damage confidence and may result in secondary impotence.

There are different medicines available in the market for this problem but they should not be taken without consulting a specialist. You should first consult a good urologist for this problem who will assess which therapy would be more effective for you, behavioral or medical.