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Why older men are healthier than older women: Lack of menopause leaves men feeling better (despite threat of dying younger)

Why older men are healthier than older women: Lack of menopause leaves men feeling better (despite threat of dying younger)

2018-11-30

By SAM BLANCHARD HEALTH REPORTER FOR MAILONLINE

Genes which come into play late in life could be the answer to why women suffer poorer health than men in old age – even though they live longer.

A study has revealed going through the menopause causes women to accumulate genes evolved to benefit males, which are bad for female health.

But because men can remain fertile long into old age, their bodies do not suffer the same decline when they pass middle age and they feel better for longer.

Women are still likely to live longer – in the UK their life expectancy is 82.9 years while men’s is 79.2 – but they can expect to be in worse health.

Scientists put the effect down to a genetic ‘sexual conflict’, where different genes benefit or harm the sexes in different ways and are in a constant ‘tug of war’.

Scientists at the University of Exeter did experiments on flies to track how genes change after the female body stops preparing to reproduce – the menopause.

They found because women no longer need to pass on their genes after middle age, they don’t produce as many which would keep them healthy in later life.

Whereas men remain fertile for longer so might need to pass on their genes at any time, meaning they are programmed to stay healthy and prepared to have children.

 

5 Mental Health Benefits Of Using Sex Toys In The Bedroom

5 Mental Health Benefits Of Using Sex Toys In The Bedroom

Although sex toys may be a 15 billion dollar business, that doesn’t mean everyone is using them. While reasons why someone might not use a sex toy vary, for those who identify as male, sex toys may seem emasculating. Women, on the other hand, generally have an easier time with owning, using, and fully enjoying sex toys.

“There are, surprisingly, a good number of psychological benefits associated with incorporating sex toys into relationships and self-pleasure,” Dr. Chris Donaghue, Ph.D., LCSW, CST, licensed sex and relationship expert, author, and TENGAambassador, tells Bustle.

As Dr. Donaghue notes, many men, both in the States and abroad, feel pressure about performing at “top-notch level in the bedroom.” It’s this pressure that can keep men from experimenting with sex toys, either alone or with their partner.

“For example, the TENGA 2018 Global Self-Pleasure Report found that almost half of millennial men (47 percent) feel they’ve been pressured to act a certain way… this includes keeping quiet about their masturbation habits, hiding their emotions, and pushing aside any yearning to better know their bodies,” Dr. Donaghue says. “This leads them to avoid using toys as aid with partners or their own pleasure, as they think that reflects on their ability to achieve orgasm or make their partners feel satisfied.”

In a world where sex toys and the innovation behind them is truly mind-blowing, they’re definitely something worth giving a try. Here are five mental health benefits of using sex toys in the bedroom.

Sex Toys Lead To More Sexual Satisfaction

“People who have used sex toys report being more satisfied with their sex life across all metrics, including quality of orgasm and quality of masturbation,” Dr. Donaghue says.

The more you explore your body and experiment with toys, the more likely you are to know how to get yourself off — whether you’re rolling solo or with a partner.

According to Dr. Donaghue, Americans report a 90 percent satisfaction level when they sleep with men who use sex toys. As for those men who shy away from toys and don’t use them, that satisfaction level is 76 percent.

Sex Toy Use Helps With Body Confidence

When you know the ins and outs of your body — literally — you gain an appreciation for it. The human body is a fine-tuned work of art. Just the fact that the clitoris exists solely for pleasure is, in itself, extraordinary.

“Those who masturbate weekly are more likely to feel positively about their looks and body than those who don’t,” Dr. Donaghue says. “Sex toys allow you to experiment with different sensations, stimulation areas and simultaneous pleasure points in a safe manner, giving you the gift of knowing what makes you feel good. Then, you can repeat this roadmap with yourself or know exactly what to communicate to your partner.”

Sex Toys Can Help You Sleep Better

Sleep is essential to our well-being. Not just because it keeps us from being cranky monsters, but it strengthens our immune systems, keeps our cognitive skills up to par, lowers depression and anxiety, and increases our libido — or at least prevents it from decreasing.

“Sex and masturbation can assist with insomnia and restlessness,” Dr. Donaghue says. “Since the activity releases oxytocin and endorphins, masturbation can help people feel calm and experience less stress. Both men and women report better sleep after incorporating masturbation into their nighttime routine, and using a sex toy can help you achieve your bedtime orgasm more quickly and effectively.”

Sex Toys Aid In Relationship Satisfaction

“Couples who incorporate variety in the bedroom are more likely to stay together long-term, and be open and honest about their desires,” Dr. Donaghue says. “Trying new sexual endeavors alleviates boredom, lessens the likelihood of cheating, and improves overall communication between partners.”

When we open ourselves up to new things, it evokes communication between partners, which is essential to relationship satisfaction and overall health of the partnership.

According to Dr. Donaghue, sex toys are both a safe and reliable way to keep things spicy in bed. It’s just all about taking that first step toward getting that first sex toy.

“After becoming comfortable incorporating toys in the bedroom,” Dr. Donaghue says, “couples and individuals can continue to explore the sex toy category and what it has to offer.”

Sex Toys Help In Sexual Dysfunction

Sexual dysfunction is real, and both men and women can suffer from it. This where sex toys can lend a helping hand. According to Dr. Donaghue, research has found that “masturbatory tools” can really help common sexual issues, such as erectile dysfunction and performance anxiety.

The Womanizer Deluxe, for example, is used to help women who struggle to orgasm. If both men and women can learn to make themselves climax through the use of toys while masturbating, it will give them more confidence in reaching orgasm with a partner, because their mind will be at ease.

Although orgasms shouldn’t be the only goal during sex, as it’s also about the journey, there’s no denying that they can be the icing on an already delicious cake. Sex toys, because of the positive effect they have on mental health, can help you enjoy that journey even more — no matter what the outcome may be.

Five reasons why men visit the gynecologist

Five reasons why men visit the gynecologist

2018-11-29

While gynecologists are known to deal with sexual and reproductive health of women, they at times find themselves having to attend to male patients. Studies conducted over a period of time in different geographical areas show that at least 10% of people who seek professional advice and services from gynas are men.For men’s reproductive system queries, men are advised to see an urologist or an andrologist since they are trained in the field and are bound to give ways forward from their experience in the field. However, some men still find themselves straying into a gynecologist’s office once in a while.

Some of the reasons men who confessed to vising a gynecologist gave include;

Fertility problems

Being unable to sire children is a major problem for married couples and it prompts need for medial insights. Men who have issues with making their partners pregnant due to low sperm count or other infertility issues often find themselves seeing gynas. This can be as a couple or individually depending on a number of factors. Here, they get advised on why they can’t be fathers and how to go about it.

To accompany their spouse

Men and women have different needs at different times in their lives. This means that no matter how close you are to your partner, there are times you’ll be away from him and vice versa. Things like going to the salon, seeing your gyna and such are all female and most men do not even stop to wonder how it goes. For some though, accompanying you to your endeavors is not a task to them.

STDs/STIs

Sexually transmitted Diseases and Infections have bothered mankind for ages. Not keen to choose gender, they affect both men and women, often forcing them to seek health attention. According to gynecologists who talked about seeing male patients, some of the men who walk in through their doors are often in search for ways to handle STIs or such. Common diseases and infections bothering these men include Yeast infection, Gonorrhea and even Syphilis.

To know what women go through

Curiosity knows neither age nor boundaries. Just like some people want to know how some machinery works, there are men who are eager to know what happens to women at the gynecologists. These men will bear the stares they get once they walk into a gyna’s waiting roomful of women just to go through the experience. They necessarily do not have an issue to present to the gyna, they are just curious of the services offered.

Matters sexual health

Most men, almost all men are concern about their sexual life more than anything else. They want to know what is healthy for their reproductive system and its functionality from specialist. From ejaculation disorders, erectile dysfunction, low libido and such, some men get the impression that talking to a doctor who knows much about women reproductive health may give them a more satisfactory sex life.

https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/evewoman/article/2001304315/five-interesting-reasons-why-men-visit-the-gynecologist

Sexual Health: Discuss with adolescent children

Sexual Health: Discuss with adolescent children

2018-11-26

Parents should openly discuss sexual and reproductive health with their adolescent children breaking the taboo and social stigma, speakers said at a roundtable yesterday.

Sexual and reproductive health is so important that future health of all individual depends on how they practise it during adolescence, they said, urging the teachers to provide adequate lessons on the topic at classrooms.

Bangla daily Prothom Alo in association with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) organised the roundtable titled “Reproductive health of urban adolescents” at the newspaper’s office in the capital.

The speakers suggested that the government and non-government organisations should put emphasis on those adolescents living in slum areas, dropped out of schools and involved in work to increase reproductive health coverage in urban areas.

Iqbal Hossain, an education specialist of UNICEF, said many adolescents in the country do not have enough knowledge about sexual and reproductive health. Even, majority of those who have some knowledge do not know the correct information.

“So, we should give them the correct information at first and then guide them properly. Then, we will have to come up with physical facilities like hygienic toilets and sanitary napkins for them,” he observed.

Noted actress Sabnam Faria said, “When my menstruation started for the first time, my parents didn’t discuss it although they are well-educated and my father is a doctor. This happened because our society doesn’t support it.”

Parents should avoid such practices and people of the society should change their mindset considering discussion on reproductive health as a taboo, she added.

Kanica Fardosh, an adolescent health expert of Save the Children, said children in slum areas and those who dropped out of school lag behind others in getting reproductive health services and advices and should get more emphasis.

MA Mannan, state minister for finance and planning, Prof Abul Kalam Azad, director general of the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS), and Abdul Quayum, associate editor of Prothom Alo, among others, spoke at the discussion.

https://www.thedailystar.net/backpage/news/sexual-health-discuss-adolescent-children-1664827

How Long Do Most Men Need to Reset Between Orgasms?

How Long Do Most Men Need to Reset Between Orgasms?

Porn might have you convinced that men are like Energizer bunnies that keep going and going and going, but the reality is a lot more human, and a lot more realistic: Even at their youngest or most virile, everyone needs some recovery time between sessions.

The male refractory period, a.k.a. the time between orgasms, can last minutes to days, says board-certified urologic surgeon Jamin Brahmbhatt, M.D. After sex, your penis becomes flaccid from neural signals telling your body to relax, especially the organ that’s been doing most of the work (yep, the penis), Brahmbhatt says.

Just like our computers or phones sometimes need a reboot, our bodies need that time as well. The excited fight-or-flight nervous system recedes, and the rest-and-restore system comes forward,” explains board-certified urologist and men’s sexual health expert Paul Turek, M.D.

After orgasming, a man’s dopamine and testosterone levels drop, while serotonin and prolactin increase. “If prolactin levels are lower, his refractory period will be shorter,” says sex expert Antonia Hall. “Other variables include stress and energy levels, arousal levels, and drug and alcohol use—including antidepressants and other prescription drugs that can hinder sexual desire.”

Individual recovery time also depends on your overall health and age, Brahmbhatt says. “Generally speaking, men in their 20s often need only a few minutes, while men in their 30s and 40s may need 30 minutes to an hour,” says Xanet Pailet, sex and intimacy educator and author of the new book Living An Orgasmic Life.

Many of the factors that impact MRP are out of men’s control. But being extremely aroused can shorten the length of the refractory period, Pailet says.

Gaining control of your orgasms can be a start to managing your recovery times.

“My best recommendation to men who want to be able to have sex multiple times in a short period is to learn ejaculatory control, which allows them to still experience an orgasm without ejaculating,” Pailet says. Ejaculatory control can be learned through breathwork, according to Pailet. There are tantric breathing techniques that can help you delay orgasm (and some breathing techniques that just make for better sex, tbh).

Of course, being your healthiest never hurts. “The best you can do is to keep that body of yours as healthy as possible by eating right, exercising regularly, and treating it like a temple,” Turek says. “A healthy body will reboot quicker than an unhealthy one.” That also includes avoiding too much alcohol, which is known to act as a depressant.

Maybe the best motivation to order that salad… ever.

Aly Walansky is a New York-based lifestyle writer. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter @alywalansky.

https://greatist.com/live/how-long-between-orgasms

‘Iran 9th country with lowest maternity death worldwide’

‘Iran 9th country with lowest maternity death worldwide’

2018-11-12

It’s a big achievement because to end the death during childbirth is a goal that UNFPA has set for the whole world – or, as we say, zero maternal deaths. There are just a handful of countries who have achieved this milestone, Dr. Natalia Kanem said.

“We have to trust women to make choices in planning their families,” a key message from the Executive Director of UNFPA.

“The woman should be the one to decide, and of course it’s natural for the woman to confer. This is the whole point: We have to trust women to make these decisions because the woman is one half of a couple and is the one who bears a child; the woman also understands how many children she already has and she also understands her responsibilities for looking after the next generation,” Dr. Kanem explained.

Dr. Kanem travelled to Iran to attend the HelpAge Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Population Ageing which was held in Tehran from October 23 to 25, with the main theme of “Family, Community and State in Ageing Societies.”

UNFPA is the United Nations sexual and reproductive health agency. Its mission is to deliver a world where every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth is safe and every young person’s potential is fulfilled.

Here is the full text of the interview:

1) Based on the latest census figures in 2016, older persons currently constitute almost 9 percent of the total population in Iran and demography experts predict that by 2050 some 20 to 30 percent of the population will be 60 years or older. How can this inevitable demographic transition be addressed with regard to the Sustainable Development Goals?

Everywhere in the world have demographic challenges that are different from each other, of course. UNFPA is quite convinced that the demographic challenges that the world is facing are really closely linked to the issue of choice. The choices that we are making today are going to influence older people as they age, but they are also linked to the cycle of life. So those same choices have to do with how we deal with young people today. Demographic transition typically refers to the phenomenon that we see in populations. In earlier times, a high birth rate was accompanied by a high death rate. Many countries had the high birth rates, women often had 8, 10, even 15 children. Even in Iran, less than 50 years ago, birth and death rates were much higher than today.

People were dying at the age of 50 or 55 and this was considered normal – something we certainly wouldn’t consider normal today. But with development we see that as choices expand typically people would choose to have smaller families so that you can invest more in each child. And as advances in medical care, nutrition and quality of life occur then the death rate also comes down. So this is the demographic transition: you have high birth rate and high death rate and then slowly over time fewer and fewer children, but also people are living much longer. So all of these change the structure of the population.

In less developed countries where UNFPA is working – for example, in parts of Asia and Africa — the “many children paradigm” is still there. The death rate is still relatively high and so the structure of the population in those countries presents a different challenge.

Iran is a very good example of a country where you’ve had these advances in development and medical care. People are now living much longer- on average 20 years longer than a few decades ago- and it’s a big achievement for Iran and for similar countries. And of course [people are having] fewer children but more children are surviving and you are not having a lot of early deaths. Then when you’ve got to the stage where Iran is now and as you look to the year 2050, for the first time you are going to have a high proportion of older people.

At the meeting I attended here we joined other partners, including the government, to develop ideas, regionally, as to how we will address some of these challenges. The Sustainable Development Goals have that word “sustainable.” It means that it should be something that is going to endure over time. Sometimes you can fix things quickly but it’s not going to last. It’s a short-term Band-Aid [solution]. What the Sustainable Development Goals are talking about is prosperity that is going to be long-lasting into the future. So in thinking about the Sustainable Development Goals, there are 17 of them. Of course there are many noble goals of the United Nations embedded in them. Every country wants peace, wants to have productive partnerships, things like health, the end to poverty, the end to hunger, etc. This everyone can agree on. It is not an issue.

But there are some other interesting SDGs which are less known like the SDG 10 which is about an end to inequality; or the SDG 5 which talks about men and women and making sure that the services of the country, of a community and of a family cover both men and women. And as we think about the ideals of climate and the environment there are sustainable goals for water and life in the sea, and there are sustainable goals for agriculture and life on Earth.

For UNFPA the relevance of all of these goals to an ageing population is that you have to strengthen not just the body and mind but the attitude of everybody to understand the cycle of life. If the baby is healthy in the mother’s womb this is a stronger child who is going to be a stronger adult and who is going to avoid some of the health problems when they become 60-70 or 80 years old. But if you have no good nutrition, lots of diseases may occur and if there’s not an understanding about the relationship of men, women, older people and younger people in the family then as you get older you are not going to be well integrated into the society. You will suffer great loneliness which is a problem, which can be even a health problem, and you are also not going to be able to be productive. The big point that we make about the demographic transition is that older people can and should continue to contribute to society.

They contribute to their family, of course, because of love. But they can also contribute to their community economically by their wisdom that they have acquired over so much life experience and also to be able to give guidance to the next generation that’s coming up.

So in a nutshell we also want to stress that these Sustainable Development Goals stand for having a world that is just, and in that just world women are half the population and therefore women are half the solution. The solution to the economic problems, because prosperity comes with more women contributing and more women in the workforce. More women being supported by childcare and other things that are going to allow them to make their contributions all the better. The relationship between healthy old age and providing and planning and protecting women all along a chain makes a difference because women tend to outlive men, so when you look at the population over 60 typically there are more women than men as opposed to half and half. But normally women do not have the chance to have pensions, for example, so poverty among older people tends to have more women represented. These are the type of questions that the Sustainable Development Goals ask us to address and these were some of the things that were discussed in the conference.

2) How does UNFPA evaluate Iran’s effort to address population ageing including increased inclusion of the older persons in the community, making cities more accessible for them, and financial support for health services?

UNFPA has worked very closely with some of the ministries that are in the lead on thinking about the family. We were much honored to have with us the Vice President who has taken leadership on some of the issues on family dialogues that you are having in this country. It’s a very enlightened way of looking at problems that every society has by trying to encourage dialogue among the generations and also to think about family life and family relationships. Iran is doing well when it comes to concentrating on better health for all, including the challenges that you face because of the migrant population and other factors.

UNFPA’s role is to assist governments as we think of what are some of the measures that we can put in place. For example, if something like an earthquake or another type of natural disaster happens, usually women are more affected than men in any country, so UNFPA works with women and girls so that together with government, we can position lifesaving supplies and how we can assure that we are ready to assist the population if, God forbid, something happens in terms of a humanitarian crisis.

We also help government to analyze some of the trends that are happening in the population, not just ageing and but also on the other side of what’s happening with the younger people in the country. Iran has a highly educated population, including women who go to school. This is something that is a model for other countries in the region and UNFPA is helping to share the experience that you have had with other countries in the region. We’ve been very gratified and happy to see that when it comes to women’s health issues Iran takes them very seriously. Your midwifery programs have been very successful, so you have fewer deaths during childbirth than other areas which had started from the same indicators where Iran did.

Iran achieved MDG 5 [United Nations Millennium Development Goals] by being the 9th country with lowest maternity death worldwide. It’s a big achievement because to end the death during childbirth is a goal that UNFPA has set for the whole world – or, as we say, zero maternal deaths. But you are already there. There are just a handful of countries who have achieved this milestone and now we are working feverishly to try to share that example, in particular, the benefits of midwives and safe delivery and antenatal care. All of these are factors that helped Iran to have women survive. No woman should die while giving birth.

Of course there is always more to do and among these is trying to strengthen key policies; we are working with government and together we are encouraging policies that seek to address and end violence against women, for example, and there are other areas that we have been working on very closely with Iran.

3) In the UNFPA State of World Population 2018 report you mention that “choice can change the world”, could you please elaborate on that?

The State of World Population report was published just a few days ago [October 17]. In this report UNFPA analyses choices – including why choices are in short supply everywhere. We looked at every country and we were looking at fertility levels and number of children per woman and we noticed that in the countries that are still very poor and are trying to raise their economic prospects they still have very high fertility. Like I was describing before, women in such countries are having more children that they actually desire. When you have a big family you have big challenges especially in a poor country, so UNFPA is working together with governments to provide contraception and also information. So that women would be aware of the things that they could do safely in order to plan their family.

Now this type of guidance is not ‘one-size-fits-all.’ It has to be done sensitively; you have to work with the culture and religion and social norms of the country and you have to understand what it is that women prefer because it should be their choice. A simple example is if a women wants to use contraception to plan her family size it should not be just one type of contraception. You should have 5 or 6 or 7 modern methods of contraception for family planning, and she will pick the one that works for her and her husband.

Now on the side of countries where fertility is on average two or three children we’ve done an analysis to see choices there and choice is relevant because very often a woman does not have a choice to work; she would like to but there is not enough social support. If there is no grandmother to look after the children, for example, what is she going to do? If there is no consideration for all of the different options, she may have the education and she may have the preparation to achieve her potential, but she may not be able to ultimately participate in the economy of her country. And this is going to make sustainable development much more difficult.

And then we also talk about developed countries where the options of not only future income but things like the policy for maternity and paternity leave are discussed. If you have a job and now you have a child will you lose your job because you now have taken leave while you were pregnant and while the child is young? And we are also very bold about saying that fathers should also have adequate paternity leave, so they can bond with the new baby and be a family together when the baby is very young. This is very helpful for the baby as they are growing to have a few weeks or a month, for example, with their father and not just the mother.

So these are some of the things the report is bringing out. And then lastly in some places – many of them in Asia-Pacific, the average fertility rate is very, very low. In Taiwan, for example, it’s an average of one child per woman – It’s the lowest in the world. In other parts of Asia like Korea and Japan where families are very small, or a country like Finland which also has low fertility, the concern is why women are not choosing to have more children. So we did an analysis to look at choices. Sometimes a woman would like to have two children but she is not able to afford. So this is a type of choice which is limited for her. There are other women whose choices are limited because of, I would say, ignorance about transmitted infections that can lead to problems of reproductive health. This is what UNFPA has to work with not just in Iran but in every country where UNFPA works. We attend to these issues of women’s health.

The current fertility rate in Iran is 2.01. From our perspective what’s normal is what the woman wants, so we don’t have targets labelled good or bad. We look at the spectrum and we provide advice based on what it is that any woman in Iran would want. I would observe that many countries see two as the ideal because you have a stable population. It’s not growing too fast and it’s not shrinking too fast. But again a lot depends on what women themselves want. If a woman wants a bigger family, we should help her to have the support to have the ability to be able to afford more children. If a woman wants a smaller family and that is her choice then we should support that choice. But for Iran your fertility rate of 2 is in balance because that’s considered “replacement rate” of the population.

4) Would you please explain why reproductive health and rights remain in the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda?

There is no country on earth that can claim that they have made reproductive health and rights a reality for everyone. Even when a country is doing well we see that there are shortfalls, maybe a farmer who is trying to have her farm in a rural area, maybe it’s a migrant or refugee etc. We always know that choices can be limited and the goal of UNFPA is to make sure that these millions and millions of people have more choices, not fewer. This is what I said earlier. It’s not good to try to tell a woman you must have two-and-a-half children

so that the statistics look good. We have to analyze what is happening with your family. Can you afford four or five children if you want that many? Well, this may be a blessing for you. But maybe you cannot afford five children, so maybe you would like contraception because you are afraid everybody will stay in poverty and you won’t be able to invest in each child well, so you should receive the help to exercise your choice accordingly.

Ultimately the point about the Sustainable Development Goals is to make sure that women are able to speak and that women are able to understand what is the future for them and for their daughter or for their son for that matter. Because of course the girl is going to marry the boy and we want to make sure the boy knows about the respect for women, we want to make sure that the boy is in good health, and also in every country we face the challenge of domestic violence and this means that raising awareness among men and boys is very important. They are the ones that are also going to share that understanding.

So as we think about the SDGs and the goal of ending poverty, women have to be an integral part of that equation. As we think about the second SDG to end hunger, for example, you know that many times women are active as farmers, women are the ones who are purchasing the food and cooking the food, so understanding about health and nutrition is good for them personally but it’s also good for the family and it’s good for the community.

And as we go through all of the SDGs, on education for example, I think we want to celebrate examples like Iran where woman have achieved and they can finish their education. This is not true in a lot of the world. In a lot of the world girls are discriminated against, they don’t get to go to school or they finish half way and then they would never go to the university. It’s not just girls that are in school; for many reasons there are girls that are also out of school, and today I saw a wonderful example in Iran of a community center [called Ofogh for adolescents where they can go and to learn to communicate and acquire life skills] where young girls are being taught through workshops and taught through interacting with each other about good health and how to avoid social problems in the future.

And we were accompanied by Dr. [Mohammad Mehdi] Gouya, Director of the Health Ministry’s Communicable Diseases Control Department, who is a brilliant scientist but who is also helping the people in Iran to understand life skills which is so important for their future.

And the last observation I made about Sustainable Development Goals in reproductive health is that it was in Tehran 50 years ago that the first International Conference on Human Rights took place and during this very famous conference that was the first time when the United Nations and all the countries agreed that it is the right of couples to freely and responsibly plan their family. So for UNFPA this was kind of our beginning and we will be 50 years old next year because we were born from this conference so this is why we are very happy to be in Iran and we know it’s a historic location for choice, for women and for couples to be able to plan their families.

5) Why has UNFPA put greater emphasis on women’s role in planning their families regarding the number of children, spacing, etc.?

The woman should be the one to decide and of course it’s natural for the woman to confer. This is the whole point: we have to trust women to make these decisions because the woman is one half of the couple and is the one who bears a child; the woman also understands how many children she already has and she also understands her responsibilities for looking after the next generation, so it’s her body and the right of the woman over her body has been established. So the woman always has the good sense to confer with everyone who is involved. Now when you say the couple it becomes a little ambiguous – you cannot dictate to a woman to either have or not have a child. The world at times had got into troubles by trying to force women against their will either to have a child or not to have a child and this is why we say that reproductive health should be women-centered and when we are talking about fertility the woman that carries the child should be the one to decide.

This is getting very interesting in a time of technology, for example with the new technology we have to be very sure to respect the right of the woman, as you know there are possibilities to either carry the baby or to be a surrogate mother. There are many things that are coming on the horizon where we feel that for the community and for the woman, herself, she should be knowing that’s her choice if she likes to have contraception it should be available; if she would like to have a baby we should support her with all the good care and support and the aftercare in the aftermath as well.

It’s interesting that as we think about the configuration of the family and as we think about the demographic transition- as I have described- the danger when you get into a low fertility environment is that there is a temptation to insist that, “Well, you should have three children – the country needs you.”

Ultimately, if you have a healthy productive ageing population that’s contributing, a smaller population can be better than a bigger one. There are many countries that have a big population but they are very poor – they have too much of a population to be able to care for them, so these are the kinds of issues that UNFPA helps to discuss with governments – and in any case I think governments would want to take good decisions based on what’s good for women in their country.

https://www.tehrantimes.com/news/429414/Iran-9th-country-with-lowest-maternity-death-worldwide

4 Common Sex Addictions To Look Out For

4 Common Sex Addictions To Look Out For

2018-10-25

Did you know that approximately 2.4 million Australians have a sexual addiction? Sexual addiction is one of the most common addictions that both men and women experience.

What is sexual addiction? Well, it’s a condition that occurs when an individual is unable to properly control his/her sexual thoughts and behaviors. More specifically, it occurs when constant sexual thoughts affect one’s ability to develop and maintain healthy relationships, be productive at work, perform daily functions, and/or separate fantasy from reality.

It is also commonly referred to as hypersexuality, sexual dependency, and sexually-compulsive behaviors. In addition, pop culture often refers to sexual addictions as satyriasis (in males) and nymphomania (in females). A person with this type of addiction is obsessed with sex. He or she may also have an extremely high sex drive (libido).

And, although sexual addictions are similar to other addictions (i.e. substance addiction and alcoholism), they differ in one major area – people, who have sex addictions are addicted to the activity, namely sex, rather than a particular substance. So, in this sense, sexual addictions are most similar to a gambling addiction.

If you are unsure if you or your partner has a sexual addiction, you are in luck, because this article will highlight four common sexual addictions that you should look out for.

“Hookups” (Casual Sex Addiction)

One sexual addiction to look out for is a “fascination” or obsession with “hookups”; aka causal sex. The truth is, “hookups” have become extremely popular in recent years. A recent study, published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior, found that causal sex is actually on the rise for white males in the US. Why? Well, mainly because societal views on sex have changed over the decades – with people become more lax when it comes to causal sex.

Plus, for some men, “hookups” offer a variety of benefits, such as “friends with benefits” and opportunities to “test the water” void of any commitments. More specifically, it allows these men to avoid long-term, monogamous relationships with one specific woman. However, when “hookups” or “stranger sex” become an everyday thing or the “ultimate goal,” the risk of a sexual addiction increases.

And, although having sex with a variety of people (without protection) can be detrimental to your physical health, if you are frequently having sex with random people (strangers), it can also negatively affect your emotional/psychological health and well-being. Constantly being in the “hookups” state of mind could also cause you to feel pressured to “perform,” leading to a host of sexual problems like premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, and/or performance anxiety.

Porn Addiction

Sometimes watching porn on the internet or television screen can be an exciting way to ignite your libido and heighten your sexual experience. But, for some people, watching porn (on a regular basis) can lead to a full-fledge sexual addiction. In other words, watching one or two porn videos can later lead to watching porn videos or looking at pornographic pictures every day – all day long, if possible.

What happens next? Your world begins to revolve around porn. Then, you start to base your view of a healthy sexual relationship on what you see on the screen, rather than on reality. And, after a while, the only way you can become sexually excited is by watching porn before you have sex. Not only that, but in recent years, there have been a growing number of reports of men, who claim to suffer from porn-induced erectile dysfunction. If you fear you might be suffering from this condition, read the article we published on this topic.

Prostitution Addiction

The truth is some people get a “rise” out of paying for sex or trading things (i.e. drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, jewelry, etc.) for “sexual favors.” These individuals view sex as a commodity – something that can be sold and bought. Some people enjoy being “in control” of the opposite sex, while others believe they are simply paying for a service – just like you pay for any other service – i.e. getting your car washed or hiring someone to remodel your home. However, you may have a sexual addiction, when non-payable sex no longer excites you. More specifically, if the only way you can become aroused is to pay for sex, there is a strong possibility you have an addiction to prostitution.

Masturbation Addiction

Although masturbation, for the most part, is a natural and healthy addition to sexual activity, there is a-such thing as too much of a good thing. The truth is one can become addicted to masturbation – without even realizing it. How? Well, it can occur after you get a boost in feel-good hormones from masturbating (i.e. oxytocin dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, and testosterone). This boost feels good – real good, so you keep masturbating to get that feeling again.

And, after a while, you do it so often and become so dependent on the “high” that before you know it… you’re addicted to masturbating. So, even though masturbation is normal, if you do it too much it can produce the same effects as a drug high. It’s important to understand that masturbation should never be used to “escape” or block out reality. A masturbation addiction can hurt your self-esteem/self-confidence, your relationship, career goals, and your sex life.

In Summary…

Nowadays, sex is no longer a forbidden topic. In fact, with the invention of technology, we now have the ability to voice our joys and pains, when it comes to sex – with people all around the world. And, although sex is a fun, exciting, and pleasurable activity that can draw two people together, it also has the ability to cause damage – real damage to one’s sex life, self-esteem/self-confidence, and romantic relationship.

However, by altering your view of sex and avoiding temptations that could lead you towards a sexual addiction, you can acquire a happy, healthy, and satisfying sex life. If you feel that you may have a sexual addiction, it is imperative that you seek help from a qualified sex therapist. With proper treatment, you can go on to have a happy addiction-free sex life.

https://www.menshealth.com.au/4-common-sex-addictions

Antimicrobial resistance to gonorrhoea treatments is rising, says PHE

Antimicrobial resistance to gonorrhoea treatments is rising, says PHE

First-line treatments for gonorrhoea are becoming less effective due to a rise in antimicrobial resistance, according to a report from Public Health England.

The latest figures show that resistance to most first-line treatments for gonorrhoea rose in 2016/17.

As a result, GPs are told to stay alert to any changes to the antimicrobials recommended for first-line use.

The report, published this month, said: ‘The effectiveness of first-line treatment for gonorrhoea continues to be threatened by antimicrobial resistance.’

It reported that resistance to azithromycin (4.7% to 9.2%), ciprofloxacin (33.7% to 36.4%) and cefixime (modal MIC from 0.015 mg/L to 0.03 mg/L) had increased in 2016/17, while resistance to penicillin had declined from 13.9% to 10.8%.

PHE said: ‘Practitioners should ensure that all patients with gonorrhoea are treated and managed according to national guidelines, and should be alert to changes to the antimicrobials recommended for first-line use.’

It also called for ‘regular testing for HIV and STIs’ for men who have sex with men and black ethnic minority women and men, if they are engaging in unprotected sex with new or casual partners.

Anyone under 25 who is sexually active should be screened for chlamydia annually and on change of sexual partner, it added.

Services that provide rapid treatment and partner notification should also be provided to reduce the risk of STI complications and infection spread.

This comes after PHE launched a campaign targeted at people aged between 16 and 24 years old, to raise awareness of STIs.

And a Pulse investigation revealed that nine out of ten councils cut spending on sexual health, alcohol misuse and weight management services, for 2018/19.

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/clinical/clinical-specialties/sexual-health/antimicrobial-resistance-to-gonorrhoea-treatments-is-rising-says-phe/20037643.article

To meet gender-related SDG targets, improve the resource allocation

To meet gender-related SDG targets, improve the resource allocation

2018-10-18

The low allocations, huge fluctuations over the years in funds, and the underspending clearly indicate that political interest in efficiently targeting the SDGs is marginal. Political interest is driven either for electoral gains or as firefighting mechanisms

Adequate resource allocation accounts for the continued deficit in health, nutrition and welfare outcomes for women and girls in India.

The trajectory towards realising the SDG targets is not going to be easy with the current level of political commitment to these issues. If this deficit has to be reduced in order to move towards the SDG targets in the stipulated time, budgets for service delivery have to be increased substantially without further delay.

Over the last few years, new programmes and schemes targeted at women and girls have been launched, especially in areas such as health, nutrition, livelihood and protection from abuse. Some progress has been made in law-making on domestic violence, sexual assault, and sex selection.However, inadequate allocation of resources have made implementation of these programmes and schemes ineffective or limited in their reach.

The health, nutrition and welfare deficit in India is still high when compared with countries of similar level of development such as Thailand or Mexico,or even countries which are less economically developed such as Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Nepal. Within this, there are class, caste and gender inequities, as well as regional inequities. A large part of this deficit is due to inadequate budgetary allocations. Even resources committed in the budget are either underspent or used inefficiently.

The picture we get from the government’s own data sets such as NFHS, SRS and NSSO is that maternal and child mortality remains a major problem in many states in India. Access to basic healthcare services, including maternal, sexual and reproductive health is grossly inadequate. Violence against women and marriage before legal age continue to be high, despite stringent legal provisions and investment in supportive programmes and services.

On the positive side, we see an increased public debate and media attention to gender issues.This periodically leads to increase in budgetary allocations – for instance, when an epidemic strikes, or children die in large numbers due to malnourishment, or rape cases get highlighted in the media.

An assessment of budget allocations and expenditures of some of the key programmes and schemes targeted at reducing gender inequities leads to the conclusion that there is lack of serious intent in achieving the goals. These programmes and schemes are launched with much fanfare but end up being populist proclamations directed towards electoral outcomes or public relations exercises.

Early study results suggest fertility app as effective as modern family planning methods

Early study results suggest fertility app as effective as modern family planning methods

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

Early results from a first-of-its-kind study suggests that typical use of a family planning app called Dot is as effective as other modern methods for avoiding an unplanned pregnancy.

Researchers from the Institute for Reproductive Health (IRH) at Georgetown University Medical Center are studying women’s use of the app for 13 menstrual cycles, or about one year. The ongoing prospective study design is the first to apply best-practice guidelines for assessing fertility awareness based methods in the testing of an app.

The interim results following Dot’s use for six cycles are published in the journal Contraception (title: Estimating six-cycle efficacy of the Dot app for pregnancy prevention.) Dot is owned by Cycle Technologies, which is solely responsible for the app.

Dot provides a woman with information about her fertility status each day of her menstrual cycle. It uses an algorithm and machine learning to identify the fertile days of her cycle based on her cycle lengths.

After women had been in the study for six cycles, the researchers found that the app had a typical-use failure rate of 3.5 percent, which suggests that Dot’s one-year typical efficacy rate will be comparable to other modern family planning methods such as the pill, injections, and vaginal ring.

“Given the growing interest in fertility apps, it was important to provide these early results,” says Victoria Jennings, PhD, principal investigator of the Dot efficacy study and director of the IRH.

718 participants in the United States enrolled in the study, and 419 participants completed six cycles of use. There were 15 confirmed pregnancies from cycles when participants used the method incorrectly (such as having unprotected sex on days of high fertility). No pregnancies occurred in cycles when participants reported correct use of the app during high risk days for pregnancy.

“Our purpose is to provide guidance to women who want to use Dot as well as to health providers and policy makers who are interested in this emerging method of family planning,” Jennings says. “We hope this paper contributes to the on-going discussion about the effectiveness of fertility apps and how their efficacy should be assessed.”

Final efficacy results are expected in early 2019.

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This study was supported by the United States Agency for International Development grant (OAAOAO13O00083).

In addition to Jennings, study authors include Liya T. Haile, Hanley M. Fultz and Dominick Shattuck of the IRH, and Rebecca G. Simmons of the University of Utah. The authors report having no personal financial interests related to the study. The Dot app is a proprietary technology developed by Cycle Technologies, a company owned by a family member of Jennings’.

About the Institute for Reproductive Health

The Institute for Reproductive Health at Georgetown University Medical Center has more than 30 years of experience in designing and implementing evidence-based programs that address critical needs in sexual and reproductive health. The Institute’s areas of research and program implementation include family planning, adolescents, gender equality, fertility awareness, and mobilizing technology for reproductive health. The Institute is highly respected for its focus on the introduction and scale-up of sustainable approaches to family planning and fertility awareness around the world. For more information, visit http://www.irh.org.

About Georgetown University Medical Center

Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) is an internationally recognized academic medical center with a three-part mission of research, teaching and patient care (through MedStar Health). GUMC’s mission is carried out with a strong emphasis on public service and a dedication to the Catholic, Jesuit principle of cura personalis — or “care of the whole person.” The Medical Center includes the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing & Health Studies, both nationally ranked; Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, designated as a comprehensive cancer center by the National Cancer Institute; and the Biomedical Graduate Research Organization, which accounts for the majority of externally funded research at GUMC including a Clinical and Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health. Connect with GUMC on Facebook (Facebook.com/GUMCUpdate), Twitter (@gumedcenter). Connect with Georgetown University School of Medicine on Facebook (Facebook.com/somgeorgetown), Twitter (@gumedicine) and Instagram (@georgetownmedicine).

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-10/gumc-esr101518.php